Saturday, September 4, 2021

OSR: Lesser Embodied Undead

The spell Create Servant is for amateurs. 

Real Necromancers understand that reanimating any old corpse is simple, once you know the secret.  But the true expert is one who can not only reanimate dead remains, but choose what kind of spirit that is called up to inhabit the remains the Necromancer has chosen.

from Left 4 Dead

Zombies-

Number Appearing: 1d20+10
Alignment: True Neutral, in the case of ones controlled by a Necromancer.  Otherwise, Chaotic Evil.
Languages: None.
Treasure: None. 

Zombies are the cheapest and easiest Undead to create.  They are designed to be created from corpses that are partially or mostly rotten, but still have a bit of meat on them.  Their bodies have started to break down, robbing them of their speed and coordination, but they still possess enough nerves and muscle for the spell to work without any additional preparation.  Zombies are born to be cannon fodder and as such, are usually created in fast numbers. 

The spirits called up to inhabit zombies are little smarter than dogs, and dim ones at that.  Being trapped in a rotting corpse still pains them, but they are unlikely to understand why they are in pain, only that they are.  Unbound Zombies eat because they are driven to do it, and they hurt others in a futile attempt to relieve their suffering.  Bound Zombies can be commanded to do specific things, but since they lack power and precision, Necromancers usually keep their directions simple, such as "Charge", "Eat" or "Attack"!

Additionally, because Zombies are so often weak, they are often given over to Disease Spirits, which are allowed to infest their bodies along with the bound spirit.  These spirits fill Zombies with their power, causing the Zombie's fluids and flesh contain some of the Spirit's power.  Those who are injured by the Zombie risk catching the disease and allowing it to enter their body.

Statblock:

Zombie
HD 0- HP 1
AR none
Atk Bite or Claw (1d6)
Mor 20
Saves 7 or less

Undead: Undead do not feel pain or get tired.  They are immune to poison and disease.  They do not need to eat, sleep or breathe.  Any spell that says "Undead" in its title or description is talking about something like this.

Sunlight Vulnerability: Undead take 1d6 radiant damage for every round they spend in sunlight.

Diseased Fluids: Zombies can carry a disease.  If this is the case, when injured by a Zombie, make a CON save.  On a failed save, you catch the disease the Zombie carries.  The most common disease a Zombie carries is Zombie Rot.

Moan: Zombies, unless ordered otherwise, automatically wail at the sight of prey.  This sound alerts all within 100' and if there are other Zombies nearby, it will attract +1d6 of them.  These Zombies will arrive next round and if they see you, they will moan, summoning more Zombies. 

Tactics:
- Approach the nearest target
- Grapple
- Bite next round

<Disease Rules:>

When you come into contact with something that is contaminated with the mana of a Disease or Plague Spirit, such as the blood or fluids of someone infected, their possessions, the insides of the room where they expired or were sick, then make a CON save.  On a failed save, you catch the disease.

Each day you are infected you can make a CON save.  You may receive penalties or bonuses, depending on where you are and what you are doing.  Clean sheets, bed rest and good food grant bonuses.  Adventuring, eating bad food or botched surgeries grant penalties.  Pass 2 CON saves in a row to be cured. 

Treatments or cures grant bonuses depending on whether or not they actually work.  Snake oil cures do nothing, while a cure that does work might give you a +10 bonus to your save (-10 if using roll-under saves).    

Diseases can also be cured by magic, or by bribing the spirit.  Disease Spirits are small and weak, and will usually take what they can get.  They can be bribed with prayers, a new victim to infect or threatened with magic that cures disease, which destroys them.  Most Plague Spirit have the temperment of a rabid weasel crossed with a drug addict.  Loathsome and pathetic in equal amounts. 

Plague Spirits are much more dangerous, being able to infect many hundreds, if not thousands of hosts at once, instead of just a handful.  Most mass outbreaks of disease are composed of large confederations of Disease Spirits of a similar type, which is why different people feel different symptoms and at different severities.  But Plague Spirits are singular, amassing large numbers of hosts before over-extending and being beaten back, or simply running out of victims and destroying themselves.  Plague Spirits usually cannot be bribed to leave a victim, unless promised lavish prizes in exchange for doing so.   

</Disease Rules:>

Zombie Rot: The infected person loses 1 CON per hour.  When he drops to 0 CON, he falls into a coma that resembles death for 1d4 hours.  Then, at the end of the coma, the infected person rises as a Skag (see below).

Zombie Horde
HP 300
Damage Threshold 1
Atk Bite (1d6/1d6/1d6 + see below)
Mor 18
Saves 8 or less

Army: A Zombie Horde is a group of 50 or more Zombies working and fighting together as a unit.  Armies move in groups- 3 can walk abreast in a 10' wide hallway.  Three soldiers in the Army are able to surround one enemy and more will be needed should there be more enemies, or should they be standing shoulder-to-shoulder or back-to-back.  Armies make all saves against area-of-effect spells with disadvantage and should a spell or ability of that kind do damage, they take full damage if evading it is based on DEX or agility.   

Variable Attacks: An Army can make a variable amount of attacks, especially if it is able to surround an enemy.  At base, Armies can make three attacks, but depending on positioning, may be able to make more.  If the Referee rules it, an Army may make a number of additional attacks up to 10 potential attacks, but this is only in a situation where a group of enemies has been completely surrounded. 

Damage Threshold: Attacks against the Army automatically hit, instead have the attacker just roll damage and compare it to the Damage Threshold.  Any attack that equals or exceeds the threshold does normal damage to the Army's HP, but any attack that fails to reach or exceed the Damage Threshold is ignored, as if it did no damage.  

Undead, Sunlight Vulnerability

Grabbing Hands: Zombies who cannot bite yet will seek to grab any foe that comes up in front of them.  Creatures can resist this by beating the Horde's STR check with a STR or a DEX check of their own.  If the Horde wins, that creature has disadvantage on defense rolls until it succeeds in a STR contest against the Horde or until the Horde is dead.  If the creature wins, it makes defense rolls as normal.

artist unknown

Skeleton-

Number Appearing: 1d8+4
Alignment: True Neutral, in the case of ones controlled by a Necromancer.  Otherwise, Chaotic Evil.
Languages: None
Treasure: None

Skeletons are the basic infantry employed by Necromancers.  They are tougher than Skags and generally more versatile.  Additionally, they are popular among novices and experts alike because of how easily they can be modified.  And sure, it might be a cliche, but the reason why cliches exist is because they work so well.

Statblock:

Skeleton
HD 1
AR 1 [Scavenged Armor Pieces]
Atk Weapon (1d6)
Mor 20
Saves 7 or less

Undead, Sunlight Vulnerability: [see above].

Already Dead: Unless decapitated, cut to pieces, burnt to ashes by sunlight or reduced to zero HP by a magical attack or weapon, the Undead has an X-in-6 chance of their body knitting itself back together and recovering from the damage they took, where X is equal to the number of HD they have.

Bare Bones: Skeletons take half damage from all sources of damage that would do deal sharp (piercing and slashing) damage.  Arrows do no damage to them.  If bullets exist in this universe, they do no damage as well.

Tactics:
- Follow pre-programmed tactics
- Fight in formation
- Do not fear your own destruction, fight to the death if ordered to

by ArtDeepMind

Skeleton Army
HP 150
Damage Threshold 2
Atk Bite (1d6/1d6/1d6 + see below)
Mor 18
Saves 8 or less

Army: A Skeleton Army is a group of 50 or more Skeletons working and fighting together as a unit.  Armies move in groups- 3 can walk abreast in a 10' wide hallway.  Three soldiers in the Army are able to surround one enemy and more will be needed should there be more enemies, or should they be standing shoulder-to-shoulder or back-to-back.  Armies make all saves against area-of-effect spells with disadvantage and should a spell or ability of that kind do damage, they take full damage if evading it is based on DEX or agility.   

Variable Attacks: An Army can make a variable amount of attacks, especially if it is able to surround an enemy.  At base, Armies can make three attacks, but depending on positioning, may be able to make more.  If the Referee rules it, an Army may make a number of additional attacks up to 10 potential attacks, but this is only in a situation where a group of enemies has been completely surrounded. 

Damage Threshold: Attacks against the Army automatically hit, instead have the attacker just roll damage and compare it to the Damage Threshold.  Any attack that equals or exceeds the threshold does normal damage to the Army's HP, but any attack that fails to reach or exceed the Damage Threshold is ignored, as if it did no damage.  

Undead, Sunlight Vulnerability, Bare Bones

Tactics:
- Varies, see below

What has this Skeleton Army been instructed to do?

1d4

1- Form a shield wall, slowly advance.  The first rank focuses on their shields while the second stabs at anything in front of those shields.   
2- Archers, then javelineers, then spearmen.  The archers fire, then retreat behind the spearmen.  The spearmen fling then javelins then tighten ranks and advance.
3- Calvary Charge.  (1d10+2%) The Skeleton Army is mounted on Undead horses, pigs or other creatures that could serve as mounts.  The mounted skeletons charge in and trample their enemies, then the skeletons on foot come in and mop up. 
4- Hook and Slash.  All the skeletons are armed with swords or spears, but 1-in10 spearmen have hooked polearms that can be used to snag enemy weapons and shields.  The polearm Skeletons unbalance the opponents and create openings for the other Skeletons to exploit.

Variant Types of Skeleton:

1d6


1- Skeleton Archer.  The best weapon to use is one that can't hurt you.  Skeleton Archers do not scared or nervous or unsteady as they calmly, carefully pick off foes from a distance.  Some are merely skeletons given bows, while others only exist from the waist down, sitting in fixed positions, their legs and hips used for other projects. 
2- Skeleton Bomber.  The Skeleton has a bomb.  He's going to run up to you, give you a hug and then the Necromancer is going to detonate the bomb strapped to him. 
3- Skeleton Wrestler.  The Skeleton's arms flower at the joints, giving him six arms blossoming from the elbow.  These arms make the skeleton an amazing grappler.  His job is to pin down foes while his allies circle around them and stab them repeatedly in the back.
4- Skeleton Crab.  A Skeleton with his legs removed and replaced with four arms and hands.  Much faster than a normal skeleton and an extremely good climber. 
5- Skeleton Apes.  Sometimes, these are actual ape skeletons.  Other times, they are humanoid skeletons with the feet replaced with hands.  This allows them to hang upside down and attack at the same time and makes them good climbers as well. 
6- Skeleton, Giant.  Bigger is usually better, or so this necromancer believed.  This is either the skeleton of a a very big creature reanimated, or it is dozens, if not hundreds or thousands of skeletons fused together into a giant humanoid shape.

artist unknown

Skeleton Heroes-

Number Appearing: Varies, see tables below.
Alignment: True Neutral, in the case of ones controlled by a Necromancer.  Otherwise, Chaotic Evil.
Languages: None
Treasure: Skeleton Heroes usually carry high quality or magical weapons and wear armor of a similar quality.

Skeletons can be empowered much more than normal Undead, as they aren't limited by any remaining organic tissue.  As such, most of the most powerful Undead in a Necromancer's entourage will be Skeletons.  Skeletons that are empowered beyond their common brethren tend to have certain tells.  These tells include such things as the Skeleton's hollow eye sockets glowing brighter than normal, the Skeleton being cloaked in a cold mist or subtly glowing with a sickly witchlight that is only visible in darkness or dim light.

Statblock:

Skeleton Hero
HD 1d4+1
AR 3 [Good Quality Armor]
Atk Varies, see below
Mor 20
Saves 7(7+HD) or less

Undead, Sunlight Vulnerability, Already Dead, Bare Bones

Tactics:
- Varies, see below

To customize a Hero Skeleton, roll on the tables below:

How many Skeleton Heroes does this Necromancer have?

1d6

1- 1
2- 2
3- 1d3
4- 1d3+1
5- 1d4
6- 1d4+2

What does this Skeleton Hero do?

1d6

1- He has four arms, each one carrying a curved blade.  Makes 4 attacks, each one doing 1d6+1 damage on a hit.
2- He has two additional torsos, each with arms and a head sprouting from his back.  Each one is armed with a bow and rain arrows down while he fights.  He is armed with a bow of his own, or a spear for close-up work.  Makes 1 melee attack that does 1d8+3 damage while the 2 bow attacks do 1d6+1 each.
3- He has arms made of dozens of humeruses, ulna and radiuses, making him look like he has beefy arms.  He wields a massive bow that can fire arrows that rip holes in the bottom of ships or punch through stone walls.  When not using his bow, he fights with a hammer that would look absurd carried by anyone but him.  He makes 1 bow attack that does 2d12 or 2 hammer attacks that do 1d12 damage.
4- He wields a bullwhip, entangling weapons and opening long slashes on unprotected flesh.  The oil he coats his whip in is toxic or poisonous in some horrible way.  When he needs more power, he switches to a sword.  He can use his whip which requires a saving throw and can target up to two creatures, or he can make 4 sword attacks that do 1d6.
5- A duelist, clad in tattered silks with a long, chisel-point sword.  Bows before engaging opponents.  Can parry multiple attacks and will allow creatures to injure him to strike his opponent.  Makes 2 sword attacks that are each do 1d6+3.
6- A skeleton modified with claws and teeth taken from beasts.  Stalks enemies like prey, striking from surprise with white fangs and petrified claws.  Makes 3 attacks, two claw attacks that do 1d8 damage and one bite attack that does 2d4.

by

Skags-

Number Appearing: 1d4+4
Alignment: True Neutral, in the case of ones controlled by a Necromancer.  Otherwise, Chaotic Evil.
Languages: None
Treasure: Since Skags resemble normal people, except for their pallor and scent, they tend to wear whatever they did in life.  Some of them are even adorned in fine silks, delicate fabrics or jewelry. 

Skags are Undead with all their meaty bits still intact.  They are only made from the freshest corpses.  Some Necromancers even use magic on them to slow or temporarily curtail the process of decomposition, preventing the Skag from rotting and spoiling it's good looks.  Others who lack the magical knowledge of how to do this sometimes resort to more unorthodox methods.

The spell, Create Servant, usually creates Skags. 

But why create Skags at all?

There are two primary reasons.  Firstly, Skags can run.  Zombies are rotting and decaying, so they can't move well.  Skeletons, with the exception of Heroes, move slowly because efficiency is important, as mana is the only thing holding them together.  They can't afford to burn through tons of it.  But Skags, with their mostly-intact musculature, can move with minimal energy and with greater coordination than most lesser Undead.

Secondly, Skags are sneaky.  Zombies are obviously unsneaky, with their limited coordination.  Skeletons rattle with their armor and their bony feet scrape along the ground.  But a Skag in stocking feet or barefoot can easily creep around and report to the Master what is going on.  These two reasons make Skags invaluable.

Finally, there is a third, less practical reason for the creation of Skags.  Sometimes Necromancers are paralyzed or tormented by guilt for what they have done, either in general or toward a specific person.  As such, they sometimes preserve the body of someone they love and even treat that person like they are still alive.  For example, if a Necromancer accidentally killed a little girl, he might preserve her body, dress the Skag in pretty dresses and have it tell him it's alright, everything is fine.  

Statblock:

Skag
HD 1d4
AR 1 [Natural Armor]
Atk Bite + Claw or Weapon (1d8 + 1d6)
Mor 20
Saves (7+HD) or less           

Undead, Sunlight Vulnerability, Already Dead

Tactics:
- Sneak around to scout
- Ambush vulnerable enemies
- Don't stand and fight

Skags that are not maintained slowly degrade and turn into zombies.    

from D&D 3E

Crawling Claw-

Number Appearing: 1d6+4
Alignment: True Neutral, in the case of ones controlled by a Necromancer.  Otherwise, Chaotic Evil.
Languages: None
Treasure: None

Crawling Claws are not made exclusively from the hands of thieves and murderers, as folklore would suggest.  Additionally, they are not usually created to fight.  Most of the time, Crawling Claws are created to be lab assistants.  They make good tools to threaten apprentices, and sometimes a Necromancer just needs a helping hand.

Statblock:

Crawling Claw
HD 0- 1 HP
AR none
Atk Scratch (1d4)
Mor 20
Saves 7 or less

Undead, Sunlight Vulnerability

Hanger-On: When a Crawling Claw damages a creature, it can choose to cling to that creature.  While on a creature, it can slip under their armor and clothing and crawl over their body, doing 1d4 damage a turn as an action.  The Crawling Claw can be pulled off by challenging it to a DEX contest.  If it wins, you can't catch it, but if you win, you can grab it and throw it off.  A Crawling Claw on someone's body can also choose to impose a -1d6 penalty on them instead of doing damage.  

Tactics:
- Drop onto someone
- Scrabble over them, doing damage or impeding their actions
- Make a nuisance of yourself

Crawling Claws created to be weapons are usually modified to make them more dangerous. 

How has this Crawling Claw been upgraded?

1d4

1- It has metal fingernails.  It does 1d6 sharp damage on a hit.
2- One of the fingers was replaced with a stinger.  It can sting one person.  The stinger is usually filled with either hallucinogens or horrible poison.
3- It has metal wires tied to the fingers and connecting it to a source of power.  The Claw clamps on and electricity passes through the wire, electrocuting the creature the Claw is clinging to.
4- The Hand has a magical glyph tattooed on it's palm.  If it touches a creature, that creature 1d6 [1= Takes 1d6 acid damage as the clothing or armor the Claw touched turns to acidic slime; 2= Takes 1d6 ice damage and has that part of the body covered in ice, imposes a -1d6 Attack and Defense penalty until the ice is thawed or broken off; 3= Takes 1d6 fire damage and catches on fire; 4= Takes 1d6 DEX damage as the flesh under the glyph starts to turn to stone; 5= Takes 1d6 necrotic damage; 6= The hand drains 1d6 HP from the creature it touches then by touching another creature, it can transfer that energy back.  The hand will usually drop off and wait for the Necromancer to pick it up.]  Some of these options use the Claw as a suicide weapon, as the blowback from using the glyph will destroy the fragile undead, as in the case of the ones that use fire or acid.

Some Crawling Claws are also given the ability to levitate and fly.  These hands are dangerous for a number of reasons, usually because of what they are carrying.

What horrible thing are the Flying Claws carrying?

1d6  
 
1- Flasks of oil.  One of them is carrying a torch.
2- Daggers.  They're a lot easier to make then a bunch of dancing weapons. 
3- Rope or wires.  They swarm around a creature, unspooling their cords and entangling the creature, then pull them tight to leave the creature bound up and helpless.
4- Large rocks.  They fly overhead and drop them on people.  Buckets full of gravel also work for this purpose.
5- A length of wood or metal.  They fly straight at the target, either at ankle level to trip them or at neck level to harm them.  Sometimes the length of wood has metal spikes along it's length to impale creatures.
6- Half carry slings, the others bags of stones or metal balls.

Skeleton Mage-

Number Appearing: 1
Alignment: True Neutral, in the case of ones controlled by a Necromancer.  Otherwise, Chaotic Evil.
Languages: The local Lingua Franca
Treasure: Fine robes, perhaps a few jeweled rings or a gilded scepter

Sometimes you need a little extra firepower, but you don't want to risk another Apprentice, or you need something to draw the attention of a nosy group of adventurers who keep chopping up your poor zombies.  What's a discerning Necromancer to do?  The answer is the same as the one from the Red Ruler who brews up a Chaos Beast, if you can't hire or find the necessary muscle, make your own.

A Skeleton Mage, sometimes known as a Psuedolich, is a certain type of Undead created with the ability to cast spells.  They are sometimes given the body to talk, or more often, for the Necromancer to puppeteer them directly.  Then, clad in ermine robes and plundered jewelry, resting on a throne of bones, they are the ideal red herring to draw a pack of adventurers while the actual Necromancer sneaks out the back with the rest of his loot and skeletons. 

Skeleton Magi are also sometimes used as retainers by powerful Necromancers or Liches.  But care must be taken with such creatures- all Undead are technically intelligent, but they are limited by the orders placed on them.  However, in order to be effective, Skeleton Magi have to given a wider degree of latitude then most.  So Necromancers must be careful when creating and commanding such Undead, for the possibility for treachery from such creatures is never far away. 

Statblock:

Skeleton Mage
HD 1d4+2
AR none
Atk Wand (1d6+2/1d6+2 necrotic) or Spell
Mor 20
Saves (7+HD) or less           

Undead, Sunlight Vulnerability, Already Dead, Bare Bones

Spellcaster: Skeleton Magi have the ability to cast spells.  They have MD equal to their HD.  Their MD burn out on a 5 or 6.  If they roll doubles or triples, they invoke Chaos.  Roll on the table below for that result.  The Skeleton Mage has the following spells prepared: Circle of Death, Cloudkill, Cone of Cold, Mage Armor and Vampiric Touch.    

Chaos of the Skeleton Mage:
1d6

1- The Skeleton Mage loses his action as he spends it vomiting up loose bones and black sludge.  The sludge is horribly poisonous for 1d4 rounds, after that it loses any power it had and becomes just sticky, viscous black liquid that reeks of rot and death.
2- A bolt of dark energy flies out of the Skeleton Mage and begins flying around the room.  All creatures must save.  The first creature to fail his save takes 1d8 necrotic damage.  The bolt persists for 1d6 rounds, after which it vanishes.
3- One random creature within 100' of the Skeleton Mage must save.  On a failed save, that creature soul is torn out his body.  On a successful save, the creature takes 1d6 necrotic damage.
4- All skeletons within 50' of the Skeleton Mage start glowing, including the skeletons inside living creatures, which shine through the flesh.  This effect lasts for 1d10 minutes.
5- One random object made of organic material animates as a 1d4 HD Undead and tries to kill the nearest living being.  This could be the Prophet's silk robe, the wooden handle of the Fighter's sword, the vellum pages of the Wizard's spellbook, etc.  This new Undead, if it doesn't have one, gains a method of movement and harming those around it.
6- The ground for 30' around the Skeleton Mage suddenly transmutes into sucking quicksand.  Creatures standing near it start taking 1d6 STR damage a round as they sink and have to make a STR save with penalties equal to the amount of STR damage taken.  For example, if your STR is reduced to 12, you have to save as if 12 was your STR.  STR damage done like this is healed as soon as the creature is freed from the quicksand. 

Tactics:
- Cast a defensive spell first
- Then cast your most powerful offensive spell
- Hit the strongest target with your next most powerful spell next round
- Refresh any defense spells and repeat as necessary

To customize a Skeleton Mage, roll on the tables below:

How many spells does the Skeleton Mage have?

1d4

1- 3
2- 4
3- 5
4- 6

And those spells are?

1d12

1- Circle of Death
2- Cloudkill
3- Cone of Cold
4- Harden Bone
5- Hateful Ground
6- Mage Armor
7- Magic Missile
8- Ring of Frost
9- Screaming Skull
10- Teeth of the Stone Dragon
11- Vampiric Touch
12- Wall of Bones

New Spells:
    
Harden Bone
-----------------------------------------------------------
R: touch    T: creature with skeleton    D: [dice] minutes

One creature you touch takes [dice] less damage for the duration and gains resistance to bludgeoning damage (takes half damage) for the same period.

Hateful Ground
---------------------------------------------------
R: 50'        T: ground        D: [dice] minutes

You target an area of ground or floor made up of up to [dice] 10' x 10' squares.  Any creature that crosses one of these squares takes [sum] sharp damage, save for half, as phantom blades surge up out of the ground and slash at them.  There is no indication of what ground is safe, except when the blades are attacking someone.

If cast with 3 or more [dice], you can designate a password that if spoken aloud, will allow a creature to safely pass over the hexed ground without being damaged.

Ring of Frost
------------------------------------------------------------
R: [dice] x 10' radius         T: area     D: [dice] rounds

All creatures around you take 1d4 damage, save for half, as you cover the affected area in a layer of ice. Calm water will be frozen into a brittle bridge.

Every creature that fails its Save is frozen to whatever surface they were touching.  Objects are considered to automatically fail.  This freezes Boots to the ground, keys in their locks, doors open or shut, etc.  If in water, creatures are usually immobilized from the feet down unless they were in deeper water.  Attempting to break loose is an opposed Strength check. The ice has a Strength of 10 + ([dice] x 2).

This spell comes courtesy of Red Kangaroo, from here.      

Screaming Skull
-------------------------------------------------------------
R: touch        T: skull        D: varies

By touching a skull, you can awaken the leftover energies in that skull.  The skull gains the ability to talk and will say what you tell it to say.  You can also speak through it like the skull is a puppet.  If not given any instructions on what to say, the skull just screams when it sees a living creature.  The skull can talk for [dice] minutes, or if this spell is cast with 4 or more [dice], permanently.

At any point during the duration, you can command the skull to explode.  This does [dice]d6 damage, save for half, to every creature within 10*[dice]'.

Teeth of the Stone Dragon
-------------------------------------------------------------
R: 50'        T: up to [dice] creatures    D: one action

You create [dice] stone projectiles out of the earth in front of you and fire them at up to [dice] creatures.  Each creature must save or take 1d6+[dice] damage.  On a successful save, the creature takes [dice] damage instead.  Creatures targeted by more than one projectile make their saves with disadvantage.  Creatures with shields make their saves with advantage, unless targeted with multiple projectiles, then they make their saves as normal.   

Wall of Bones
---------------------------------------------------------------
R: 50'        T: A line up to 10*[dice]' long        D: one action

The caster creates a wall of bones up to 10*[dice]' long and 10+[dice]' high.  The wall can be any shape, as long as it is one continuous path along the ground.  Any creatures in the path of the wall when it is created take [dice] sharp damage as sharp bones pierce their flesh.  Any creatures that touch the wall after it has been created take 1d6+[dice] sharp damage.

The wall has [sum] HP, takes half damage from sharp and anyone who attacks it with a melee weapon that does bludgeoning damage takes [dice] sharp damage as tiny flecks of bone shatter off and cut the soft flesh of his face, hands and the inside of his mouth and throat.  The wall persists until destroyed.

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